LEAP Campus Toolkit

Resources and Models for Innovation

VALUE Rubrics for Assessing Learning

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As part of the Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education (VALUE) project, teams of faculty and other academic and student affairs professionals developed rubrics for sixteen of the AAC&U Essential Learning Outcomes, creating this set of VALUE rubrics for use in any institutional context. The VALUE rubrics emerged from analysis and synthesis of existing campus rubrics, organizational statements on outcomes, input from experts in the respective fields, and faculty feedback from campuses.

Each VALUE rubric contains the most common and broadly shared criteria or core characteristics considered critical for judging the quality of student work in that outcome area. Thus, the VALUE rubrics reflect faculty expectations for essential learning across the nation, regardless of institution type, size, location, or mission.

The rubrics are available free of charge after users respond to a brief, one time only questionnaire. This information is used strictly to allow AAC&U better to understand the utility and extent of use of the rubrics on campuses. No individual information will be released or published under any circumstances.

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19 Responses

  1. Carla Myers says:

    We are implementing the 15 LEAP competencies into our integrative studies courses.

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  2. Diana Bullen says:

    I am interested in receiving the VALUE Rubrics as we are revamping our outcomes and assessment for cultural diversity

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    Moderator Reply:

    If you click “View File” on this page below the VALUE logo, you will be prompted to enter an email address and fill out a short questionnaire. You can then access all 15 rubrics.

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    VICTORIA DAHMES Reply:

    thanks

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  3. Mary Kay says:

    I am interested in whether LEAP/VALUE has any rubrics for the first essential learning outcome:
    “Knowledge of Human Cultures and the Physical and Natural World” involving “study in the sciences and mathematics, social sciences, humanities, histories, languages, and the arts.” Thanks!

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  4. Susan Albertine says:

    We decided as a matter of principle to leave it to faculty on campuses to address the first ELO and to create rubrics in and across disciplines. I am aware of two projects that are doing that, or getting started. Project Kaleidoscope is involved in development of STEM rubric(s) and the current AAC&U Shared Futures Project is likely to yield rubrics on global knowledge. We would love to find other examples to share!

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  5. Ashley Finley (Senior Dir. of Assessment, AAC&U) says:

    Thanks for your excellent comment, Mary Kay! No VALUE rubrics were created for the first LEAP outcome area (Knowledge of…) because this area aligns so closely with disciplinary content. Because through training and scholarship faculty are already quite skilled at assessing content, the VALUE rubrics were created to enable faculty (and other campus professionals) to assess other essential learning outcomes for which clear assessment frameworks are commonly lacking (or nonexistent). Hope this helps!

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  6. Mary Kay says:

    Thank you, Drs. Albertine and Finley, for your explanations! I would also like to inquire about training to use the VALUE rubrics. Are there such opportunities and, if so, where are they publicized? Thanks again!

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    Caleb Ward Reply:

    I see that the latest issue of AAC&U’s “Peer Review” is on this very topic: http://www.aacu.org/peerreview/pr-fa11wi12/index.cfm

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    Mary Kay Reply:

    Great! I’ll be sure to get that. We are doing a core curriculum revision now, so the timing is perfect! Thanks,

    Mary Kay

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    Nancy O'Neill Reply:

    Hi Mary Kay, I am a former colleague of Ashley’s and Susan’s. I was searching the assessment resources here and came across your question.

    I had compiled some resources in response to a similar question posed to me last fall by an AAC&U campus representative. Here is an excerpt of that response:

    ——————-
    However, we do realize that a great deal of assessment of the first outcome area – more familiarly known as “content” — is still done through mechanisms such as multiple choice tests, and that there may not be shared agreement or understanding among faculty about what “high”, “medium” and “low” levels of proficiency looks like within different disciplinary/knowledge domains.

    I spoke with Terry Rhodes, who heads up our VALUE project, and he recommended you look at http://www.openedpractices.org and the NILOA website, http://www.learningoutcomeassessment.org, as potential sources of information.

    I also googled “rubrics for history knowledge college” and came up with this article at the AHA website: http://www.historians.org/perspectives/issues/2010/1010/1010tea1.cfm. It contains a link to Utah State University’s rubrics for lower-division and upper-division history courses. I also searched the AAC&U web page and see that USU presented at our 2010 Annual Meeting: http://www.aacu.org/meetings/annualmeeting/AM10/documents/TuningatUtahStateHandout.pdf.

    If you use these kinds of search words on the http://www.aacu.org website, you may find other presentation materials that we have posted from our meetings that relate to your query.

    ———————

    I hope this is helpful –

    Best, Nancy

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    Mary Kay Reply:

    Thanks, Nancy! I will definitely check out OpenEdPractices and NILOA. Meanwhile, am I correct that the Utah State example is a plan for assessing the History major? We’re looking for rubrics for what every undergrad, regardless of major, should know about history, science, art, literature, etc. I gather that not much has been done in this area? Thanks again!

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    Nancy O'Neill Reply:

    Hi Mary Kay, yes, the Utah example involved the history major, and you point out an important distinction in wanting to find “content” rubrics for what might be called general knowledge competency. I don’t know off-hand what exists (and have not searched), but if you can’t find much out there, the major-related knowledge rubrics might provide a starting point that helps you arrive at some general knowledge rubrics. If you do come across general knowledge rubrics, I’m sure the community here would be interested in learning about them. Good luck!

  7. Shaianne Osterreich says:

    I am in charge of faculty development for your first year seminar program and am interested in integrating the LEAP rubrics into our discussions.

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  8. I would also like to gain access to the LEAP rubrics.

    Thanks,

    Tina

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  9. Kate Fenton says:

    Desire access to rubrics

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    Moderator Reply:

    If you click “View File” on this page below the VALUE logo, you will be prompted to enter an email address and fill out a short questionnaire. You can then access all 16 rubrics.

    Reply to comment

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